Educated interpreters often experience the industry from another angle. The interpretation agencies’ battle to send the cheapest interpreters has its impact on those who are educated and who want to build a career within interpretation.

 

It’s a rainy autumn day when Assia enters the office. Assia has been a part of TikkTalk since the beginning of the year and has worked next to her law studies.

“I think it’s nice to be able to have more control over my interpretation day. One of the best things about TikkTalk is that the power is given back to the interpreters and not to the middle men.”

When she was on the search for different agencies, Assia came across TikkTalk and discovered that things worked differently. After signing up, she quickly learned how TikkTalk worked. Features like being able to talk directly with the customer, no billing paperwork and personal notifications before assignments are some of the things that make TikkTalk easy to use for Assia.

At the same time, Assia also sees challenges in the industry. There are many challenges that could be handled better than they are today.

“I wish there was more regulation in the industry. For example, the Police, UDI, PU and the courts have their own register of interpreters. Because there is no common platform, the different customers do not know if anyone is busy somewhere else. It creates more work for both interpreters and customers who need to spend more time finding interpreters.

A common platform had not only eliminated such challenges, but also made it harder to take shortcuts. We often hear that there are not enough Arabic interpreters. Both in the media and from customers. At the same time, Assia says she knows about several qualified interpreters that don’t have enough work.

“I have heard of several receptionists who are responsible for booking interpreters, but that don’t want to call long lists of interpreters. They therefore call agencies that in many cases send unqualified interpreters. I remember I interpreted in court and my co-interpreter was booked through an agency. We did the same job, but he was paid approx. 40% of what I was paid. I do not think it’s right that the agency should get 60% of the fee.”

She believes a model that TikkTalk has, where TikkTalk has a service fee of 20% is a fair solution. TikkTalk is happy to have Assia and many other good interpreters on the team. Both Assia and TikkTalk agree that cooperation and openness are important factors in the work to be able to offer interpreters a better and more efficient work day.

Share This